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Week 1 – The 16/8 Diet and Squat, Bench and Deadlift x 5 Days of Week

Part 2:

The Workout – The first workout I used was a workout called the 40 Day Workout. I believe the program was first thought up (as far as I’m aware) by Pavel Tsasouline the guy known for popularising kettlebells then adapted by Dan John (http://danjohn.net/) a top level strength and conditioning coach over in the states.

The workouts consist of very brief but high frequency training sessions with only a few exercises.

Spoiler Alert: I have been a trainer for a long time and training myself for an even longer. This program, the first time I did it redefined both my thoughts on exercise frequency and volume.

The exercises I selected were barbell squats, bench press, deadlifts, military press and ab wheel. This isn’t quiet within Dan’s recommendations of the exercises that should be used as he recommends a farmer’s carry. However, performing a carry didn’t really align with my current goals so I changed it.

I had a strategy using this program as my first program of my 10 weeks. After having had the run of injuries I’ve had for the past 12 months I was significantly weaker than normal. I knew being weaker would both limit the amount of muscle I could put on and how quickly I could lose weight. This is due to increasing muscle size roughly being related to

weight x volume (reps x sets x no. of sessions)x time under tension

And weight loss related to

Volume (distance, time, reps x sets, etc) x exercise intensity

Where intensity is related to how hard you can exercise and a greater level of strength can allow you to reach higher exercise intensity, within reason.

I’ll give you a brief overview of the workout from Dan John’s own words here. At the end of the article I’ll provide a bit more info for those really interested.

There are a few “rules” before we begin:
1. Never miss a rep!
2. Follow the “Rule of Ten” for the appropriate lifts for an advanced lifter; if Patterning needs to be done, do it as often and as much as necessary; and, use the rules of 15-25 for the appropriate half body lifts.
3. Advanced athlete’s warm-ups
10-25 Goblet Squats
75 Swings (Sets of 10-25; really grease that Hinge Movement)
1-5 Get Ups (Half Get Ups are fine as is the Kalos Sthenos variation)

“Easy Strength” for an Experienced Lifter
Week 1
Mon (1)_____Tues (2)_______Wed (3)_______Fri (4)_______Sat (5)
2x5                         2x5                         5-3-2                      2x5                         2x5

Week 2
Mon (6)_____ Tues (7)______Wed (8)_______ Fri (9)_______ Sat (10)
2x5                         6 singles               1x10                       2x5                         5-3-2

The workouts

Two sets of Five: it should be easy and be like your second or third warm up lift in a typical workout. The idea, the “secret,” is to get THIS workout to feel easier and easier!

Five-Three-Two: Five reps with your 2 x 5 weight, add weight for three, then a solid double. Make the Double!!!

Six Singles: I don’t care how you do this, but add weight each set. No misses!

One set of ten: the day after six singles, very light load for ten easy “tonic” reps.

The pros of the workout:

So why do this diet, what are the benefits?

  1. You get really really good at a few lifts due. This is likely primarily due to the volume of training you put into those lifts across a week just working the same movement patterns (i.e., greasing the groove).
  2. The program can be broken down into two week blocks so you really only need to do the program for a fortnight at a time.
  3. It’s probably something really different to anything you have done before.

Cons of the workout:

  1. If you like to change exercises regularly this program gets boring quick
  2. Not a tremendous calorie burn due to the abbreviated volume

How did I find this diet?

I have done this workout before and knew it was a way of getting my strength back really quickly. I started off really light with my lifts due to not wanting to aggravate my previously inflamed rib cartilage which affected by the weight I could lift and my ability to valsalva (breath hold/block).  My lifts went up very quickly however I did find my ribs were getting sore when I went closer to my maxs so had to dial it back a little. I have posted my lifts below though remember these lifts were regaining strength after injury and not doing these weights for the first time.

Lift                                          Start                      After Two Weeks             Previous PRs

Squat                                    40 kg                      120 kg                                   137.5 kg
Bench                                   40 kg                      80 kg                                      85 kg
Deadlift                                                40 kg                      120 kg                                   147.5 kg
Military Press                     20 kg                      55 kg                                      65 kg

I felt like this was the right choice for me starting out on this program to build strength. I really enjoyed the progress I got from it and watching my numbers go up with ease. However, I did find the program very boring and repetitive doing the same exercises every session. I have done this program before for 5 weeks straight changing the exercises every fortnight, which I got great results from. However I did eventually have to change the routine, not because of lack of results but because I couldn’t handle the monotony of doing the same exercises all the time.

In terms of weight loss I didn’t feel like the program would do much over the long term. The weight loss I experienced I would put more down to starting the new 16:8 Diet and from just changing my exercise routine more so then it being an effective exercise routine for weight loss.  

In general I’d only recommend this program for individuals with experience lifting for at least 6 months, better 12 months plus. I’d also only recommend this program if your primary aim is strength gains, to mix things up a little or if you are stuck on a plateau. I wouldn’t say it is a very effective weight loss program but then that’s not what it’s designed for though it was the right choice for my circumstances.

Hope you enjoyed let me know if you have tried anything like this and the results you got.

Dan John’s Program 40 Day Workout

Since it keeps popping up, I am going to share what I am working on. This is only a page or two of a much larger piece:

Let’s start with an advanced experienced trainer who has “never” done any Loaded Carries. (In three weeks, I will be a genius as the Farmer Walks alone will change everything.) 
There are a few “rules” before we begin:
1. Never miss a rep!
2. Follow the “Rule of Ten” for the appropriate lifts for an advanced lifter; if Patterning needs to be done, do it as often and as much as necessary; and, use the rules of 15-25 for the appropriate half body lifts.
3. Advanced athlete’s warm-ups
10-25 Goblet Squats
75 Swings (Sets of 10-25; really grease that Hinge Movement)
1-5 Get Ups (Half Get Ups are fine as is the Kalos Sthenos variation)


“Easy Strength” for an Experienced Lifter
Week 1
Mon (1)__Tues (2)_____Wed (3)______Fri (4)_______Sat (5)
2x5 2x5 5-3-2 2x5 2x5

Week 2
Mon (6)__ Tues (7)____Wed (8)_____ Fri (9)_____ Sat (10)
2x5 6 singles 1x10 2x5 5-3-2

Lifts for the above:

Press Movement: Change the lifts every two weeks, “Same, but Different.” So flat bench press, incline bench press, and military press can be exchanged for each other after every two-week block

Pull Movement: Either do Bat Wings in combo with the press, two to three isometric holds for about ten seconds every workout, or simply skip this and get the work in from the other movements.

Hinge Movement: There are two options here depending on need: either pick a deadlift variation (and rotate it every two weeks, for example, thick bar deadlifts, snatch grip deadlifts, clean grip deadlifts, orthodox deadlifts, Jefferson Lifts or Hack squats) or do kettlebell swings in the 75-100 range. (These options will all cover the need for pulling, too.

Squat Movement: Again, ideally one would alternate movements after every two weeks, front squats, back squats, overhead squats, zercher squats or safety squats are all fine.

Loaded Carry: Vary the distance EVERY time, and probably the load…if you can.

Important Note: This is not the “Order” of the workout. More on that later…

The workouts

Two sets of Five: it should be easy and be like your second or third warm up lift in a typical workout. The idea, the “secret,” is to get THIS workout to feel easier and easier!

Five-Three-Two: Five reps with your 2 x 5 weight, add weight for three, then a solid double. Make the Double!!!

Six Singles: I don’t care how you do this, but add weight each set. No misses!

One set of ten: the day after six singles, very light load for ten easy “tonic” reps.


Example Workout for an Experienced Lifter:
Monday, Day One.
Incline Bench Press: 165 for five reps, 165 for 5 reps (300 Max Single)
Thick Bar Deadlifts: 185 for five reps, 185 for 5 reps (265 Max Single)
(This is the Pull and the Hinge Movements…an advanced lifter)
Front Squats: 185 for five reps, 185 for 5 reps (405 Max Single)
Farmer Walks: 105 with each hand, 100 meters out and back (three stops)
Ab Wheel: five reps.

Day Two can be heavier or lighter depending on mood and feel. The important thing is to show up and get the movements in. If one day is too hard and compromises the next day, that is fine as long as you lighten the load and continue getting the reps in without compromising speed.

Day Three “should” begin with the five rep number from the usual 2 x 5 workout, then add some weight for three, and finally add some weight for two. Be sure to get the double. Most people on the easy strength program find that this workout is the test for how things are progressing. The weights begin to fly up on the double and that is good, but stop there. Remember, this is a long-term approach to getting strong and don’t keep testing yourself. Save the big effort for, well, never.

Day Four and Day Five are the most confusing days. Again the load on the bar “depends” on how you feel. If the efforts feel easy and light, “nudge” the load up. Here is the secret (again): the goal of this program is gently raise your efforts (load) on the easy days so that the bar feels light. If you start out lifting a weight, say 205 at one effort level and in a few weeks you are lifting 245 at the same perceived effort and speed, you ARE stronger.

After a day of rest, Day Six is going to feel easy and it should be like that. Get the reps in.

Day Seven has a simple rule: you will do six singles adding weight EACH rep. So, it can be five pounds or fifty depending on how each single feels. It is NOT a max effort on the last set, it is the sixth single. If the loads feel heavy, just add five pounds. If the bar is flying, add more.

For people who come from the tradition of “smashing the face on the wall,” Day Seven is confusing. Your goal is to determine the load on how the weight feels. If it pops right up and feels light, toss on the plates. If it doesn’t, respect today and realize that you are going to have plenty of opportunities to get stronger in the future.

Day Eight is a “tonic” day, the way we used to use the term. Go really light and just enjoy ten repetitions. It can be as light as 40% of max (or lighter if you feel like, too) and just use the movement to unwind after yesterday’s heavy attempts.

Day Nine is often the day when people see the reasoning behind the program. This is the day where the weights seem to often be just “far too easy.” That is the sign of progress in this program. I remember actually thinking I misloaded the bar and I had to double check my math as the bar seemed to be far too light to be right. 

Day Ten is often the day where people “test” themselves a little and this can be fine as long as you feel like going after it. Again, don’t miss. 

Week Three, Option One

Now, the original program designed by Pavel demanded that you repeat Weeks One and Two for three additional times. Oh, and it works well. By Week Five, I was a machine on the lifts and broke lifetime Personal Records, smashing my Incline Bench Press record by fifteen pounds (and doing it for two reps, not just a single) and crushing my old Thick Bar Deadlift record (from 265 to 315). This is staggering improvement. So Option One is to simply keep on keeping on.

Week Three, Option Two
I like this one more for most athletes. You make small changes to the movements, from Bench Press to Incline Bench Press, Thick Bar Deadlift to Snatch Grip Deadlift and Front Squat to Back Squat. This is Pavel’s “Same, but different” approach. That small change seems to keep enthusiasm high for the entire Eight weeks.

Week Three, Option Three
I have a few athletes doing this now and I believe (maybe “hope” is a better word) that this is the better option for speed and power athletes. It is both a “deload” week and week filled with more metabolic challenges.

Day One
Push Press or Push Jerk (“Rule of Ten”) Five sets of Two, adding weight each set, is a great workout.
Litvinovs: After doing a Hinge or a Squat movement, either sprint, sled or prowler immediately after finishing the first movement. In a gym setting, this can be difficult, but I have done this outside with great success with just a kettlebell and a hill. The complete article will be in the appendix. 

Day Two

Left Hand Only!
• Waiter Walk
• Suitcase Walk
• Single Arm Front Squat (Kettlebells are best)
• Suitcase Deadlift
• One arm row on the TRX (or suitable device)
• One arm Bench Press.
Reps, sets, load, time and every other factor “depends.” The idea is to push the stability and symmetry muscles and movements. There is an odd metabolic hit to these moves as one sweats a lot more than expected doing this. So, for example, this can be done with a single Kettlebell in a park (which is wonderful, by the way) and the athlete can challenge various aspects of training and get a good workout while also practicing mastery of body position and dynamics. 

Doing just one side also frees up the mind a little bit. It is pretty obvious what you will be doing in a few days so you can experiment a bit and play the edges of tension and relaxation as you train.

Day Three
Push Press or Push Jerk (“Rule of Ten”) Five sets of Two, adding weight each set, is a great workout.
Litvinovs: After doing a Hinge or a Squat movement, either sprint, sled or prowler immediately after finishing the first movement. In a gym setting, this can be difficult, but I have done this outside with great success with just a kettlebell and a hill. The complete article will be in the appendix. 

Day Four
Right Arm Only!
• Waiter Walk
• Suitcase Walk
• Single Arm Front Squat (Kettlebells are best)
• Suitcase Deadlift
• One arm row on the TRX (or suitable device)
• One arm Bench Press.

At the beginning of Week Four, the athlete will mix up the variations in the basic movements (Push, Pull, Hinge, Squat, Loaded Carry) and progress along using the same rep and set template in Weeks One and Two. 

After finishing the program (Weeks One and Two repeated four times total; Option Three would be a twelve week program), fully assess mobility, basic strength levels and the program vis-à-vis your goals. I would suggest maybe an FMS screen and blood tests, too, but costs can be an issue.

Now, the workout itself does NOT necessarily go in this order:
Warm-Ups
1. Push 
2. Pull
3. Hinge
4. Squat
5. Walk/Run/Sprint under load
Correctives

In fact, I think the real insight of the past ten years for me is understanding the role of perceived strengths and weaknesses by the athlete in their training system.

Week 1 – The 16/8 Diet and Squat, Bench and Deadlift x 5 Days of Week

Part 1:
I’m going to start this with a little disclaimer in that I am not suggesting you do any of the diets or training programs I am writing about. I do not know your personal situation. These are simply my own personal experiences and if you would like to try any of them please come in and see me first or consult your doctor before making any drastic changes.

Week 1 Transform

Across week 1 you can see I had a rapid change in my body-shape. I was using an intermittent fasting approach known as the 16/8 Diet and I was using a training protocol where I was squatting, benching and deadlifting 5 days of the 7. I thought I’d start with the first week transformation as this is where you can see a lot of changes. I’ll cover the basic changes I made to my diet and explain why before I go into the actual 16/8 eating protocol and the exercise protocol I used.

The first week’s changes look a lot more impressive than they actually are. Would you believe I only lost 1kg of bodyfat? What did happen though is I lost a massive amount of fluid which I was retaining. So overall although it was only 1 kg bodyfat the scales showed a drop of 2.6 kg. How I achieved this was by changing the parts of my diet which could negatively impact the rate at which I lose bodyfat and those that could cause me to retain more fluid then I should. 
- Eating at regular and consistent times. This has affects on the hormonal response that occur post meal which I explain later in this article.
- Cut alcohol to no more than 2 drinks of a Friday and Saturday night – A single alcoholic drink will supress testosterone production. Testosterone is a key hormone involved in the fat burning process. By limiting T-production you severely impact both your muscle gain and weight loss potential. 
- 1 x Coffee per day – Caffeine can cause cortisol to rise. If you are a fast caffeine metabolising individual caffeine can speed up weight loss results but if you are a slow metabolisers like myself it will cause cortisol the stress hormone to rise causing excess fluid retention and negatively affect weight loss.
- Sweets/deserts down to one each day on the weekend. Simply calorie reduction.
- Bread down from around 6 slices per day to 4. Bread is probably one of the most common and evil things for weightloss and I recommended getting rid of it almost completely if you are serious about losing fat.
- Dropped processed (i.e., sausages, ham, bacon, etc) and roast meats and roast dinners. These are very high in calories and will severely affect the rate at which you can lose weight.

The Diet – 
I used the 16/8 diet which is a form of intermittent fasting. The premise of the diet is that you fast for 16 hours per day and eat during an 8 hour window. So for me I only ate between 1 pm and 9pm. Essentially skipping breakfast and morning tea. During the fasting time you are allowed to drink fluids but it should be zero calorie liquids such as water, green tea, peppermint tea, black coffee, etc but not allowed to eat any foods. By skipping breakfast you are reducing the overall calories you take in per day in addition there a number of other positive metabolic effects which I will list in the pros section.

Before I get into the pros however I will make note of one important aspect of the 16/8 which a lot of individuals don’t realise. Although you are skipping a meal (i.e., breakfast) you must make sure you are consistent with both having lunch and having it at a regular time. Two reasons, meal times and variation of have been shown to both affect circadian rhythm and weight loss results. There was one study done where two groups eating equivalent calorie deficit diets ate either at regular times or on an adlib schedule. The group eating on a regular schedule lost weight whereas those eating on an adlib schedule although eating the same amount of calories didn’t lose any weight.

Another note, when breaking the fast with your first meal it is important to keep your first meal low in simple carbs such as bread, rice and white potato. This reduces the insulin spike after breaking a fast, as your body will be extra carb sensitive after a prolonged period of not eating.

The pros of the diet:
So why do this diet, what are the benefits? 
1. Studies have shown that the 16/8 diet doesn’t result in a slowing metabolism the same way as what occurs with being on a calorie restricted diet for a prolonged period.
2. Studies have shown that the diet works.
3. Muscle sparing effect of the diet. This is a little counter-intuitive as you’d expect not eating frequently and being on a calorie deficit would result in muscle loss. However due to an elevation in growth hormone and a depression in insulin whilst you are fasting there is actually a muscle sparing affect. In addition this hormonal environment whilst fasting creates an excellent fat burning environment.
4. Potential for your body to become better at utilising fat stores for fuel. This is due to the fact whilst you’re fasting, carbohydrate (glycogen) stores will become low. As a result your body may be required to produce ketone bodies from fat stores in order to supplement the wavering carbohydrate supply. As our western diet generally means we almost always have a surplus of carbs in our diet we have become poorer fat burners and heavily carbohydrate reliant beings. This diet forces our body to adapt/re-adapt to using fat as a primary fuel source as it was intended.
5. AUTOPHAGY, this is essentially the house cleaning of unnecessary cells in the body. I won’t go into it too much here but is a really-really good thing and has huge implications for overall health and wellness including for those individuals not overweight.
6. This diet is easier to adapt to eating habits long term then a lot of other diets which is a strong positive.

Cons of the diet:
1. There can be some headaches or dizziness when first starting this diet due to the requirement for ketone body adaption. Hence it may require you to work up to a 16/8 split rather than just hitting the ground running
2. It can exacerbate poor eating habits or binge eating if you are someone prone to this. You can’t go into the diet with the mindset that you were really good skipping breakfast so now you can reward yourself for the rest of the day. 
3. Studies show it is more difficult to gain muscle on a 16/8 diet then during a traditional eat every 3 hrs diet. However muscle loss has not been shown to be an issue as per what one might expect.
4. If you’re a breakfast lover you might find that you miss having breakfast.
5. The diet is not suitable for everyone. If you suffer from depression or chronic fatigue this diet may not be suitable for you. 
6. If you are type 2 diabetic or pre-diabetic there is still a question mark if this diet is helpful or harmful.
7. To get the best results you still need to apply the other good eating principles(i.e., eat clean and healthy, eat at regular times and don’t skip meals excluding the obvious, reduce calories, etc)

How did I find this diet?
I actually found this diet a lot easier then I was expecting. I have tried it before and the first time I did it I had to work my way up increasing my fasting length by an hour a day due to dizziness. However for someone who has never skipped a breakfast in their life the hunger is surprisingly easy to adjust to and actual just goes away. Unlike what you expect, which is that the hunger will just build up and up until your stomach devours you from the inside out. It actually hits you more like waves building up then going away completely. The diet has also taught me to better control my hunger and how to better cope with hangriness which I don’t get anywhere near as much.

My energy levels on this diet were great which I do really like about this diet and I did find I had from free time in the mornings. I will make a note though that you definitely need to commit to this diet for a minimum of two weeks to get a proper feel for its effect on energy levels. It takes the body a while to adapt the first time. This being my second time doing it I found I was just about able to hit the ground running unlike the first time. 
On the negatives though, I really didn’t like exercising in a fasted state. I found it made exercising much harder in the mornings. Although I did feel like it helped with the fat burning. I also missed having breakfast, not because of the hunger but just because it is a meal I really enjoy. The other big thing for me is I did feel like it hampered my ability to gain muscle and as this was one of my goals for this transformation it was a bit of a negative tick. However as a maintenance or weight loss diet I’d rate it positively.

Would I recommend this diet, providing you’re in good health, you’re not a binge or reward eater, you get ticked off by your Dr and get a blood test pre- and post-diet and you monitor your health weight and measurements whilst doing it I’d say yes. The diet teaches you to better understand your body and your appetite, I think it can assist with some important physiological adaptions such as utilising ketone bodies and may have positive health benefits based on the autophagy that occurs. A majority of research reflects positive changes in regards to bio-markers for health.

Let me know if you enjoyed this and/or if you have had any experience with this diet, positive or negative and what your opinion of it is. I’m sure there are lots of readers interested to hear what you have to say too. I will write about the exercise program I used next week in the second part of this article as it was becoming very long article.

Monday, 24 July 2017 04:16

10 Week Transformation - Part 2

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I’m sure you’re all hanging out to hear how I did my transformation so you can apply a few tips yourself, so here goes. I did the transformation a little different then what you would call typical. I was pretty confident that I could make the changes I wanted so decided to turn the process into a bit of an experiment.

I decided whilst I was super motivated and focused I wanted to test a few different diets and exercise protocols and see just what affect they had on my body and what results could be achieved with them. As generally when I set myself on a goal my focus is pretty unwavering so I knew what ever crazy protocol I gave myself I knew I’d be able to give it a proper go. So I decided I was going to change my diet and the exercise protocol approximately every fortnight. This way I could test out a whole bunch of training methods and diets get a feel for them and also would be able to give feedback to you guys on my opinion of the different things I tried. As you could imagine I get asked about a different diet or exercise program every other day and it’s great when I have some first-hand experience to give you my opinion.

To make this experiment a little more accurate I decided I wanted to track my results. In order to this I would weigh myself daily, measure bodyfat weekly and take weekly selfies. I do realise though even with my regular monitoring of body changes I was breaking the number rule of experiments, that is only manipulate one variable at a time. I was manipulating two both diet and training but I was kind of matching the diet and exercise programs so they complimented each other. So before picking the diets and the training protocols first thing is, I had to decide on a goal.

I decided getting lean by itself wouldn’t be enough but I also wanted to get fitter put a bit more strength and more size back on and all in 10 weeks. I lost a lot of muscle and fitness throughout 2016 with a run of injuries including a sub-luxated shoulder, a sprained ankle and inflamed rib cartilage (costo-condritis) which had kept me from training with much more than a couple of kilos for 6 months not to mention starting a new family and a plethora of uni work.

So now that I had decided on the goals and a timeline I had to decide what diets and what training programs. For the diets I decided I would try intermittent fasting (16/8 diet), basic calorie restriction, a low carb and a ketogenic diet. As for exercise I decided I’d try the Squat, Bench and Deadlift Everyday (it’s a Dan John program), a simple bodybuilding style split routine, a heavy 5x5, a metabolic conditioning style training ( think crossfit’esque style) and a hybrid style which I’ll explain later.

So over the next few posts I’ll write up a rundown on what I found and what I think of each of the diets and training programs I tried. Feel free to ask me any questions as I’m sure there’ll be things I leave out or questions you guys have that I don’t think of. Also let me know if you think there were any other diets or training programs you think I should have given a go.

Monday, 24 July 2017 03:06

10 Week Transformation - Part 1

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So most of you know I just finished a quick 10 weeks of getting back in shape. I've attached my before and after pics which only a few of you have seen. I'm not generally one to go posting too many pics of myself with my shirt off but hopefully if they inspire one person posting them was worth it.

10 Week Transformation

I wanted to do this transformation not only for myself after having a rough and injurious 2016 but to show all of you what is possible. A real person and person you know with full time work, a family and a busy life. Yes I am a trainer which helps me with the knowledge of what to do but beyond that I still needed to train the same as you and eat clean the same as you. Meaning if you really want these same changes you can do it, the same as me.

Over the next few weeks I intend to write about exactly what I did to achieve my transformation which I hope you all enjoy and helps all of you with your journeys. ~ Steve, Team Beach Fit

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